Oct 2, 2014

71 notes
squishfacestudio:

Ladies and gentlemen.
I never thought we’d be silly enough to actually publish a Squishface comic book, but having been funded to do so by the City of Moreland, I’m happy to announce the imminent existence of SQUISHZINE BRUNSTOWN, which is filled with stories and illustrations about BRUNSWICK ITSELF.
The artists:
Arran McKenna
Marta Tesoro
Nadia Toukhsati
Jase Harper
Scott Reid
Jess Parker
Ive Sorocuk
Martin Nixon
Lauren Hills
Ele Jenkins
Alex Clark
Teags Humm
Sam Wallman
Sarah Howell
Michael Fikaris
Gregory Mackay
David Blumenstein
A fabulous front cover by Ben Hutchings.
A fabulous back cover by Jo Waite.
And this book is FREE. You just need to attend the MoreArt public art launch on October 26, or pick one up around the City of Moreland in the following months!
More info later.

I’ve made a little four-pager for this! Watch this space.

squishfacestudio:

Ladies and gentlemen.

I never thought we’d be silly enough to actually publish a Squishface comic book, but having been funded to do so by the City of Moreland, I’m happy to announce the imminent existence of SQUISHZINE BRUNSTOWN, which is filled with stories and illustrations about BRUNSWICK ITSELF.

The artists:

  • Arran McKenna
  • Marta Tesoro
  • Nadia Toukhsati
  • Jase Harper
  • Scott Reid
  • Jess Parker
  • Ive Sorocuk
  • Martin Nixon
  • Lauren Hills
  • Ele Jenkins
  • Alex Clark
  • Teags Humm
  • Sam Wallman
  • Sarah Howell
  • Michael Fikaris
  • Gregory Mackay
  • David Blumenstein

A fabulous front cover by Ben Hutchings.

A fabulous back cover by Jo Waite.

And this book is FREE. You just need to attend the MoreArt public art launch on October 26, or pick one up around the City of Moreland in the following months!

More info later.

I’ve made a little four-pager for this! Watch this space.

Sep 16, 2014

325 notes
katherinewirick:

NEWS FLASH: Urban Outfitters has done something horrible and offensive.
UO does horrible, offensive things all the time; take a look if you don’t believe me. This time, though, it’s personal.
That kid up there, Bill Schroeder, was killed at Kent State. He was a friend of my father’s. They were in ROTC together. If it hadn’t been for a single meaningless choice, a roll of the dice, it could’ve been my dad instead of him.
I will give a free digital comic to ANYONE who publicly pledges to boycott UO and its subsidiary brands, Anthropologie, Free People, BHLDN, and Terrain.
They’re not selling the shirt anymore, and they’ve apologized (unconvincingly). The next group of people they dehumanize might not happen to include me. But it’s a sure bet they’re going to keep on being a moral cesspool. The best thing you and I can do, as far as I can figure it, is not shop there, and tell other people not to shop there. 
Here’s some info about the comic you’ll get. You can pledge here by reblogging, you can tweet @kwirick, or you can pledge on Facebook. I’ll send you the discount code.
Urban Outfitters made Bill Schroeder a joke. I want to introduce you to him as a person.

* * * * *Half a world away in Australia there’s no point in me boycotting a foreign company. So I bought the comic instead.
Highly recommended. UO’s puerile shock-tactics aside, you should read Katherine’s comic. The digital download is only $5. It’s a very moving piece of work; you can feel the cold rage and despair bubbling beneath it.
Support an artist, and in the process learn a little about the history of American militarisation. Hold on to your humanity. Good luck.
"May 4, 1970: Thirteen seconds of shooting, and four college students lie dead on the ground. David Wirick was a straight-arrow ROTC sophomore anticipating a career in the Army when National Guard soldiers shot and killed his classmate. In this graphic memoir, originally exhibited at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, I used a single huge page to bring to life my father’s eyewitness account of the killings at Kent State, a story that raises disquieting questions about American freedom and the abuse of power. But NO ONE IS SAFE is also a personal meditation on art, rage, and the end of childhood."

katherinewirick:

NEWS FLASH: Urban Outfitters has done something horrible and offensive.

UO does horrible, offensive things all the time; take a look if you don’t believe me. This time, though, it’s personal.

That kid up there, Bill Schroeder, was killed at Kent State. He was a friend of my father’s. They were in ROTC together. If it hadn’t been for a single meaningless choice, a roll of the dice, it could’ve been my dad instead of him.

I will give a free digital comic to ANYONE who publicly pledges to boycott UO and its subsidiary brands, Anthropologie, Free People, BHLDN, and Terrain.

They’re not selling the shirt anymore, and they’ve apologized (unconvincingly). The next group of people they dehumanize might not happen to include me. But it’s a sure bet they’re going to keep on being a moral cesspool. The best thing you and I can do, as far as I can figure it, is not shop there, and tell other people not to shop there. 

Here’s some info about the comic you’ll get. You can pledge here by reblogging, you can tweet @kwirick, or you can pledge on Facebook. I’ll send you the discount code.

Urban Outfitters made Bill Schroeder a joke. I want to introduce you to him as a person.

* * * * *
Half a world away in Australia there’s no point in me boycotting a foreign company. So I bought the comic instead.

Highly recommended. UO’s puerile shock-tactics aside, you should read Katherine’s comic. The digital download is only $5. It’s a very moving piece of work; you can feel the cold rage and despair bubbling beneath it.

Support an artist, and in the process learn a little about the history of American militarisation. Hold on to your humanity. Good luck.

"May 4, 1970: Thirteen seconds of shooting, and four college students lie dead on the ground. David Wirick was a straight-arrow ROTC sophomore anticipating a career in the Army when National Guard soldiers shot and killed his classmate. In this graphic memoir, originally exhibited at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, I used a single huge page to bring to life my father’s eyewitness account of the killings at Kent State, a story that raises disquieting questions about American freedom and the abuse of power. But NO ONE IS SAFE is also a personal meditation on art, rage, and the end of childhood."

Sep 14, 2014

17 notes
Terrah thought that, apart from the poorly-executed text, the panel had been a fairly successful experiment.
Terrah resolved to be in many more like it, as soon as possible.

Terrah thought that, apart from the poorly-executed text, the panel had been a fairly successful experiment.

Terrah resolved to be in many more like it, as soon as possible.

Aug 30, 2014

4 notes
I read some comics with art by Kerascoet and Olivier Pichard, among others. Then had a go at stripping everything right back, and thinking about light (but not overthinking it). 

Now I feel like I’m getting somewhere! I hope to have more to share soon.

I read some comics with art by Kerascoet and Olivier Pichard, among others. Then had a go at stripping everything right back, and thinking about light (but not overthinking it).

Now I feel like I’m getting somewhere! I hope to have more to share soon.

Aug 26, 2014

11 notes
Aug 25, 2014

7 notes
I’m still aliiiive! And I have new watercolours. Watch this space…?

I’m still aliiiive! And I have new watercolours. Watch this space…?

Aug 3, 2014

2,826 notes
blackblobyellowcone:

When the A.V. Club asked me to talk about what inspired me to get into comics, they meant for me to talk about a piece of media. Zara was that thing for me, when my brother bought it for me in New York in 2001. But I can’t talk about Zara without talking about the context in which I read Zara, as a tween suddenly on fire with the realization that my body was becoming a battleground. Since this comic was posted, I’ve been accused of basically lying in order to push an agenda, as if these experiences that make up my life are so unbelievable that I must have sensationalized them for some crass motive. I thought about juxtaposing the experiences of my white male schoolmates, to show how insulated and relatively uncomplicated their lives were at this time, as they related them to me. But I figured the bros in the comments would do justice enough to that, and they don’t disappoint.  

Predictably, when asked to imagine a world where men have no power and no human rights, some men get REALLY testy. Cue the accusations of misandry, cue the common-knowledge that women are too catty, bitchy, passive-aggressive, hysterical, and shrill to run the world, am I suggesting that women are somehow BETTER THAN MEN? Blah burp fart. 

HONEY is that world. And it’s a world full of horrors. But it’s a world lived on female terms. All I am asking is that you try to imagine it, and ask yourself if it is functionally any better or worse than the world we live in.  

HUGE thanks to my AD Oliver Sava for sticking up for me and getting this thing published. 

You can read the full thing here, or by clicking the gif above

You can read the (much safer for work) version on the AV Club here

You can read HONEY Issue 1 here for free

Or buy the print version in my shop here 


Misogyny has been in the news a lot these last months, and it’s good to see it discussed by more and more people. It’s good to see it named, pointed out, dragged reluctantly into the spotlight.Nothing I have read in all of this coverage, however, comes to the topic as rawly or bluntly as the piece above. 
This comic is a punch in the gut and you should read it. 
(And for my part, I guess I should read ‘Zara.’)

blackblobyellowcone:

When the A.V. Club asked me to talk about what inspired me to get into comics, they meant for me to talk about a piece of media. Zara was that thing for me, when my brother bought it for me in New York in 2001. But I can’t talk about Zara without talking about the context in which I read Zara, as a tween suddenly on fire with the realization that my body was becoming a battleground. Since this comic was posted, I’ve been accused of basically lying in order to push an agenda, as if these experiences that make up my life are so unbelievable that I must have sensationalized them for some crass motive. I thought about juxtaposing the experiences of my white male schoolmates, to show how insulated and relatively uncomplicated their lives were at this time, as they related them to me. But I figured the bros in the comments would do justice enough to that, and they don’t disappoint.  

Predictably, when asked to imagine a world where men have no power and no human rights, some men get REALLY testy. Cue the accusations of misandry, cue the common-knowledge that women are too catty, bitchy, passive-aggressive, hysterical, and shrill to run the world, am I suggesting that women are somehow BETTER THAN MEN? Blah burp fart. 
HONEY is that world. And it’s a world full of horrors. But it’s a world lived on female terms. All I am asking is that you try to imagine it, and ask yourself if it is functionally any better or worse than the world we live in.  
HUGE thanks to my AD Oliver Sava for sticking up for me and getting this thing published. 

Misogyny has been in the news a lot these last months, and it’s good to see it discussed by more and more people. It’s good to see it named, pointed out, dragged reluctantly into the spotlight.

Nothing I have read in all of this coverage, however, comes to the topic as rawly or bluntly as the piece above. 

This comic is a punch in the gut and you should read it. 

(And for my part, I guess I should read ‘Zara.’)

(via rexobxo)

Jul 28, 2014

2 notes
Jul 27, 2014

5 notes
[As] dissident writers have so often found, the indirection and metaphor of fantasy can be helpful when airing controversial subject matter; not that Carter would have minded about causing offence, but, whether she minded or not, by using the timesanctioned form of fairy tales she acquired readers who would not otherwise have read her. And she was using the forms of fantasy and fairy tales with conscious radical intent; in a letter to her friend Robert Coover, she wrote: “I really do believe that a fiction absolutely self-conscious of itself as a different form of human experience than reality (that is, not a logbook of events) can help to transform reality itself.”
http://www.theguardian.com/books/2006/jun/24/classics.angelacarter
Jul 16, 2014

135 notes

colourfantastica:

☆ Colour Fantastica “Spread the Love” Competition ☆

CHECK OUT THE KICKSTARTER PAGE HERE :)

Fly the Colour Fantastica is a story-driven comic anthology produced by 12 Australian artists. Through heart-felt story telling and colour as the main tool, each artist draws one chapter reflecting on the themes of growth, revelation, and small victories. A celebration of the little things that make the bigger picture, Fly the Colour Fantastica invites readers to travel these rich and brilliantly coloured worlds.

We’re running a social media competition to help spread the word about this little project. It’s easy!

RULES:

1) LIKE, FOLLOW & SHARE/RETWEET/REBLOG on Facebook, Twitter OR Tumblr and we’ll enter your name into a draw to WIN 1 copy of the book + 1 limited edition A3 PRINT of the book cover + an ORIGINAL SKETCH from one of our artists! Shipping included!

2) You have to both follow AND share to be eligible. You’ll miss out on the chance to win if you just follow, or just reblog. But if you just want to reblog this for the heck to it, that would be neat, too!

3) The more platforms you cover, the more chances you have to win!!! That is, we’ll put your name in per social media platform you follow+share this competition on.

4) We will announce the lucky winner 1 week after the kickstarter campaign has ended, and we will contact you via your relevant platform.

CHECK OUT THE KICKSTARTER PAGE HERE :)

This is our way of saying thanks to you for spreading the love and giving our anthology a go. Thanks for reading, and reblog away!

<3 Team Colour Fantastica

This is just brilliant - I can’t wait to see the final product. Come oooonnnn payday…

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